Urbanisation continues to accelerate. Growing cities demand more and more resources. The logistics chain is under pressure. Environmental concerns now take centre stage. Sustainable infrastructure is now a top priority for cities.

The modern city’s challenges can be solved at sea. This study exposes how better co-operation between maritime actors, public authorities, and urban planners and thinkers can spark the revolution necessary to solve the critical challenges we face today. Together, we can build a sustainable infrastructure that will not only benefit ourselves, but the whole planet for generations to come.

 
 
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Wave
15

out of

20

15 of the world’s 20 megacities are at risk due to rising sea levels. The IPCC has predicted “a rise in average sea level over the next 100 years ranging between 13 to 28 cm in a low scenario and 26 to 59 cm for a high scenario.”

 

Maritime
transformation

We must develop a supremely efficient, ecologically sound, digitally connected, collaborative ecosystem, that delivers economic, social and environmental sustainability. Now.

Opportunities abound

Everything required for a sustainable world is already within our grasp. Closing the growing connectivity divide and hastening the transition towards renewable energy sources will benefit everyone. Cities and ports will gain in efficiency, while sustainability will protect our oceans, ports, cities, and planet.

Logistical pain points

Many of our world’s leading ports and pathways are suffering from congestion, compromising the efficiency of shipping operations. Timetables are impacted and planning is becoming increasingly complex. The solution?Data sharing through improved connectivity will improve communications and planning, which will enable smart solutions such as “just-in-time (JIT)” arrivals, something already taken for granted in industries like aviation.

Systemic change is required

Systemic challenges must be addressed before concrete solutions can be implemented. Global regulation and cooperation between different stakeholders must be increased to streamline infrastructure.

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Cities and ports can collaborate differently

The obstacles to achieving sustainability are not just technical or economic, as they are bound to people and their political hierarchies. Cities can build bridges with their counterparts committed to tackling these challenges. Ports can come together to develop and share best practices.

4 key findings

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Leadership:

A collaborative model between cities & ports is needed.
Futuristic scenery of the city

Technology:

Regulation is required to accelerate adoption and encourage further innovation.
Person with dark hair sitting in a clasroom in front of a computer

Data:

It takes standardisation and sharing to drive efficiency and sustainability.
A young man with light hair standing on a shore and looking at a water on a sunny day

Awareness:

Shipping needs the recognition and attention it deserves to accelerate transformation.
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Cities must take the lead

City leaders must step-up and play their part. The maritime and energy industries will fully support their efforts. We are all accountable. We must collectively move forward with a sympathetic response to the world and find smarter ways of doing business across our oceans. The time to act is now.

What now?

CITIES:

Be bold! Become involved in the global, political process, and strengthen connections with your ports.

INDUSTRY:

Engage! Help accelerate legislation, and take part in collaborative projects, even if it means partnering with competitors.

CITIZENS:

Voice your demands! Be active in the debates. Reconnect with your local ports.
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“We have to reconnect citizens with their maritime environment; if people start asking for the return of their water, we will see change.”

- DONG PING WONG, FOUNDING PARTNER, FUTURE MAP

“Building a space that provides a market interface for shipping, creates a civic interface that is accessible to all the citizens and a habitat that could build capacity to encourages biodiversity is adding value in the whole ecosystem. Building a city infrastructure needs to be important to all stakeholders.”

- THOMAS KOSBAU, FOUNDER & PRINCIPAL ARCHITECT, ORE DESIGN + TECHNOLOGY

"The sheer diversity of the maritime cluster is an important asset for creating innovative solutions to the current challenges. At the same time, this diversity is the main obstacle for getting everyone involved to commit to an ambitious sustainability agenda.”

- MARTIJN TROOST, PROJECT MANAGER ROTTERDAM MARITIME CAPITAL